Hotel Review: Shangri-La Tokyo Showcases Chinese and Japanese Art

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Michael Taylor standing at the entrance of the Shangri-La hotel, Tokyo. Photo Credit: Accidental Travel Writer.

Hospitality

Michael Taylor was flown to Tokyo, Japan, by United Airlines. This is the ninth in a series of travelogues based on his trip to the Japanese capital.

I recently spent six nights in Tokyo, Japan. During my last three nights, I was housed at the Shangri-La hotel, Tokyo, which is located a short walk from the Imperial Palace and right next door to Tokyo Station.

Because of the hotel's proximity to Tokyo Station, it offers a Meet and Greet service at train platforms at the station, an exclusive service of the hotel. I took advantage of this service after checking out, and it really did de-stress my journey to the airport by train. Having someone show me the way and carry my bags what a real pleasure.

The Shangri-la Tokyo occupies the top 11 floors of Marunouchi Trust Tower Main, a 37 floor mixed use building within walking distance of the Imperial Palace, the Ginza shopping district, and Nihonbashi, Tokyo's historical and cultural heart.

I would have to say that location is this hotel's top draw. Practically everything I wanted to see and do was within walking distance. So I didn't have to ride trains or buses during my three day stay.

Chinese and Japanese Art

One of the key things that sets the Shangri-La Tokyo apart from other hotels in the Japanese capital is its magnificent collection of 2,000 pieces of Asian art, which is said to draw inspiration from the Tang Dynasty Chinese poet, Bai Juyi.

Behind the front desk, for example, is a magnificent gold and black lacquer mural celebrating China's Qing Ming Festival. It was copied from a mural on display at the Imperial Palace Museum in the Forbidden City in Beijing that was created during the Song Dynasty by renowned Chinese artist Zhang Zeduan

The Shangri-La hotel, Tokyo, has 200 rooms and suites. Those on one side of the building have views Tokyo Bay and the Japanese capital's newest landmark, Tokyo Sky Tree, which soars 634 meters into the sky. Those rooms on the other side of the building have views of downtown Tokyo and the Imperial Gardens. On a clear day you can see Mount Fuji.

My room had the latter view, and this is the view I would recommend.

During my stay at the Shangri-La Tokyo, I had access to the executive lounge, which served yummy breakfasts in the morning and cocktails with mouth-watering snacks in the evening. The hotel also has a spa, a fitness centre, an indoor swimming pool, and facilities for weddings and banquets.

To Be ContinuedFor More on My Adventure in Tokyo, Japan

 

 

 

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